To Your Health: Cardiology

​Many Don’t Know How to Respond in a Heart Health Emergency

by Gerald Sotsky, M.D., Director, Valley/Cleveland Clinic Affiliation, Valley Health System, and Chair, Cardiac Services, Valley Medical Group

Posted on February 5, 2018
Would you know what to do if a man or woman at your son’s baseball game went into cardiac arrest? Would you recognize the signs if you were having a heart attack? A new survey by Valley’s cardiovascular affiliate Cleveland Clinic reveals that many Americans aren’t sure.  

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​What Causes Congestive Heart Failure Hospitalizations?

by Cardiologist Kariann Abbate, M.D., Heart Failure Specialist, Heart Care for Women, Valley Medical Group

Posted on January 31, 2018
Heart failure (HF) affects approximately 5.7 million adults in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If not properly managed, HF can lead to frequent hospitalizations.  A heart failure hospitalization should be viewed as a sentinel event.  Five year survival after a heart failure hospitalization is only 20 percent, a prognosis that is worse than most cancer diagnoses. Importantly, if HF is properly managed by team of skilled heart failure clinicians, prognosis and quality of life can improve.   

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Preventing Strokes in Patients with AFib

by Suneet Mittal, M.D., Director, Electrophysiology, The Valley Hospital, and Medical Director, Snyder Center for Comprehensive Atrial Fibrillation.

Posted on September 5, 2017
Did you know that more than 3 million Americans are affected by atrial fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation, which is also referred to as AF or AFib, is the most common irregular or abnormal heart rhythm disorder. It decreases the heart’s pumping ability and can make the heart work less efficiently. In addition, patients must be aware that AFib can lead to potentially life-threatening problems such as blood clots and a higher risk of stroke.

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​Take Control: The Role of Psychosocial Stressors in Heart Disease

by Elliot Brown, M.D., Valley Medical Group, Cardiology, Clifton

Posted on February 20, 2017
The treatment of atrial fibrillation (AFib) involves not only world-class medical care but a consideration of psychological and behavioral factors as well. Behavioral cardiology — a new discipline within cardiology — focuses not only on the physical aspects of heart disease, but also the psychosocial stressors that may impact the progression of heart disease.

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​Evidence-Based, Patient-Centric, Team-Directed Healthcare for Patients with AFib

by Suneet Mittal, M.D., Director of Electrophysiology at The Valley Hospital and Medical Director, the Snyder Center for Comprehensive Atrial Fibrillation

Posted on February 15, 2017
When it comes to successfully treating atrial fibrillation (AFib), collaboration is proving to be more crucial than ever.  

Atrial fibrillation, or an irregular heartbeat, can lead to blood clots and is associated with a higher incidence of stroke and heart failure.  Today, more than 2.7 million people in the U.S. live with AFib, and that number is expected to double by 2050.  Guidelines on the management of AFib released this summer by the European Society of Cardiology and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery suggest that a comprehensive treatment approach may help curb this trend.

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​Heart Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention

by Gerald Sotsky, M.D., Director, Valley/Cleveland Clinic Affiliation and Chair, Cardiac Services, Valley Medical Group

Posted on February 8, 2017
Did you know that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of men and women in the United States? And, according to the American Heart Association, a heart attack strikes someone in the United States about every 43 seconds. Although these statistics are worrisome, you can help to protect yourself by knowing your risk for a heart attack and the signs and symptoms to look for. 

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Know Your Numbers: New Survey Shows Many Americans are Unaware of Their Risk Factors for Heart Disease

by Benita Burke, M.D., Medical Director, Heart Care for Women, Valley Medical Group

Posted on February 1, 2017
​A just-released study by Cleveland Clinic, of which we are an affiliate of their heart program, shows that while 68 percent of Americans are worried about dying from heart disease, many don’t know the basic numbers important for heart health.

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Do You Have Risk Factors for Heart Disease?

by Gerald Sotsky, M.D., Director, Valley/Cleveland Clinic Affiliation, and Chair, Cardiac Services, Valley Medical Group

Posted on January 3, 2017
Did you know that heart disease is the number one killer of men and women in the United States? And, according to the American Heart Association, a heart attack strikes someone in the United States about every 43 seconds. Although these statistics are worrisome, you can help to protect yourself by knowing your risk for a heart attack and the signs and symptoms to look for.

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Managing Atrial Fibrillation with an Integrated Approach

by Suneet Mittal, M.D., Director of Electrophysiology and Medical Director of the Snyder Center for Comprehensive Atrial Fibrillation

Posted on October 5, 2016
This summer, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) partnered with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery to release new guidelines on the management of AFib, focusing on an integrated team approach. At Valley, the Snyder Center for Comprehensive Atrial Fibrillation is delivering the patient-centered integrative care outlined in these recommendations. 

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Simple Tips to Combat a Sedentary Lifestyle

by Sarah DeLeon Mansson, D.O., Cardiologist, Valley Medical Group

Posted on September 21, 2016
 The American Heart Association (AHA) recently released a science advisory on the dangers of being sedentary. According to the statement, sedentary time may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, even among physically active people.  In this day and age of smart phones and tablets, it is more important than ever to be diligent about staying active.  Recent data shows that since the 1960’s, people are burning less calories at work, and that 54.9% of adult waking time is spent sedentary.  This is why it is more important than ever to “sit less and move more” as the AHA recommends.

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